Mexican American adolescents' academic achievement and aspirations: The role of perceived parental educational involvement, acculturation, and self-esteem

Francisco D. Carranza, Sukkyung You, Vichet Chhuon, Cynthia Hudley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

45 Scopus citations

Abstract

As the number of Mexican American school-aged children continues to increase, researchers, practitioners, and policymakers are in critical need of information to better understand and serve them. This study used structural equation modeling to examine the relationship among perceived parental educational involvement (PPEI), acculturation, gender, and self-esteem on the academic achievement and aspirations of Mexican American high school students (N = 298). Results revealed direct effects of perceived parental educational involvement, students' level of acculturation, and students' self-esteem on students' achievement and aspirations. Acculturation and self-esteem also revealed indirect effects on aspirations and achievement through parental educational expectations. Implications of these findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)313-333
Number of pages21
JournalAdolescence
Volume44
Issue number174
StatePublished - Jun 1 2009

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