Metabolomics profiling reveals profound metabolic impairments in mice and patients with Sandhoff disease

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Abstract

Sandhoff disease (SD) results from mutations in the HEXB gene, subsequent deficiency of N-acetyl-β-hexosaminidase (Hex) and accumulation of GM2 gangliosides. SD leads to progressive neurodegeneration and early death. However, there is a lack of established SD biomarkers, while the pathogenesis etiology remains to be elucidated. To identify potential biomarkers and unveil the pathogenic mechanisms, metabolomics analysis with reverse phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) was conducted. A total of 177, 112 and 119 metabolites were found to be significantly dysregulated in mouse liver, mouse brain and human hippocampus samples, respectively (p <.05, ID score > 0.5). Principal component analysis (PCA) analysis of the metabolites showed clear separation of metabolomics profiles between normal and diseased individuals. Among these metabolites, dipeptides, amino acids and derivatives were elevated, indicating a robust protein catabolism. Through pathway enrichment analysis, we also found alterations in metabolites associated with neurotransmission, lipid metabolism, oxidative stress and inflammation. In addition, N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulphate, key component of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) was significantly elevated, which was also confirmed by biochemical assays. Collectively, these results indicated major shifts of energy utilization and profound metabolic impairments, contributing to the pathogenesis mechanisms of SD. Global metabolomics profiling may provide an innovative tool for better understanding the disease mechanisms, and identifying potential diagnostic biomarkers for SD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)151-156
Number of pages6
JournalMolecular Genetics and Metabolism
Volume126
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

Fingerprint

Sandhoff Disease
Metabolomics
Metabolites
Biomarkers
G(M2) Ganglioside
Hexosaminidases
Dipeptides
Reverse-Phase Chromatography
Principal Component Analysis
Glycosaminoglycans
Oxidative stress
Lipid Metabolism
Synaptic Transmission
Liquid chromatography
Hippocampus
Oxidative Stress
Liver
Principal component analysis
Assays
Brain

Keywords

  • Biomarker
  • GM2 gangliosidosis
  • Metabolomics
  • Sandhoff disease

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Cite this

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title = "Metabolomics profiling reveals profound metabolic impairments in mice and patients with Sandhoff disease",
abstract = "Sandhoff disease (SD) results from mutations in the HEXB gene, subsequent deficiency of N-acetyl-β-hexosaminidase (Hex) and accumulation of GM2 gangliosides. SD leads to progressive neurodegeneration and early death. However, there is a lack of established SD biomarkers, while the pathogenesis etiology remains to be elucidated. To identify potential biomarkers and unveil the pathogenic mechanisms, metabolomics analysis with reverse phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) was conducted. A total of 177, 112 and 119 metabolites were found to be significantly dysregulated in mouse liver, mouse brain and human hippocampus samples, respectively (p <.05, ID score > 0.5). Principal component analysis (PCA) analysis of the metabolites showed clear separation of metabolomics profiles between normal and diseased individuals. Among these metabolites, dipeptides, amino acids and derivatives were elevated, indicating a robust protein catabolism. Through pathway enrichment analysis, we also found alterations in metabolites associated with neurotransmission, lipid metabolism, oxidative stress and inflammation. In addition, N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulphate, key component of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) was significantly elevated, which was also confirmed by biochemical assays. Collectively, these results indicated major shifts of energy utilization and profound metabolic impairments, contributing to the pathogenesis mechanisms of SD. Global metabolomics profiling may provide an innovative tool for better understanding the disease mechanisms, and identifying potential diagnostic biomarkers for SD.",
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author = "Li Ou and Michael Przybilla and Whitley, {Chester B}",
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AU - Whitley, Chester B

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N2 - Sandhoff disease (SD) results from mutations in the HEXB gene, subsequent deficiency of N-acetyl-β-hexosaminidase (Hex) and accumulation of GM2 gangliosides. SD leads to progressive neurodegeneration and early death. However, there is a lack of established SD biomarkers, while the pathogenesis etiology remains to be elucidated. To identify potential biomarkers and unveil the pathogenic mechanisms, metabolomics analysis with reverse phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) was conducted. A total of 177, 112 and 119 metabolites were found to be significantly dysregulated in mouse liver, mouse brain and human hippocampus samples, respectively (p <.05, ID score > 0.5). Principal component analysis (PCA) analysis of the metabolites showed clear separation of metabolomics profiles between normal and diseased individuals. Among these metabolites, dipeptides, amino acids and derivatives were elevated, indicating a robust protein catabolism. Through pathway enrichment analysis, we also found alterations in metabolites associated with neurotransmission, lipid metabolism, oxidative stress and inflammation. In addition, N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulphate, key component of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) was significantly elevated, which was also confirmed by biochemical assays. Collectively, these results indicated major shifts of energy utilization and profound metabolic impairments, contributing to the pathogenesis mechanisms of SD. Global metabolomics profiling may provide an innovative tool for better understanding the disease mechanisms, and identifying potential diagnostic biomarkers for SD.

AB - Sandhoff disease (SD) results from mutations in the HEXB gene, subsequent deficiency of N-acetyl-β-hexosaminidase (Hex) and accumulation of GM2 gangliosides. SD leads to progressive neurodegeneration and early death. However, there is a lack of established SD biomarkers, while the pathogenesis etiology remains to be elucidated. To identify potential biomarkers and unveil the pathogenic mechanisms, metabolomics analysis with reverse phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) was conducted. A total of 177, 112 and 119 metabolites were found to be significantly dysregulated in mouse liver, mouse brain and human hippocampus samples, respectively (p <.05, ID score > 0.5). Principal component analysis (PCA) analysis of the metabolites showed clear separation of metabolomics profiles between normal and diseased individuals. Among these metabolites, dipeptides, amino acids and derivatives were elevated, indicating a robust protein catabolism. Through pathway enrichment analysis, we also found alterations in metabolites associated with neurotransmission, lipid metabolism, oxidative stress and inflammation. In addition, N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulphate, key component of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) was significantly elevated, which was also confirmed by biochemical assays. Collectively, these results indicated major shifts of energy utilization and profound metabolic impairments, contributing to the pathogenesis mechanisms of SD. Global metabolomics profiling may provide an innovative tool for better understanding the disease mechanisms, and identifying potential diagnostic biomarkers for SD.

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