Metabolic syndrome and physical performance in elderly men

The osteoporotic fractures in men study

Susan Everson-Rose, Misti Paudel, Brent C Taylor, Tien Dam, Peggy Mannen Cawthon, Erin Leblanc, Elsa S. Strotmeyer, Jane A. Cauley, Marcia L. Stefanick, Elizabeth Barrett-Connor, Kristine E Ensrud

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To examine the association between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and objective measures of physical performance. Design: Cross-sectional analysis of the cohort study, the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study. Setting: Six clinical sites in the United States. Participants: Five thousand four hundred fifty-seven ambulatory men (mean age 73.6 ± 5.9). Measurements: Physical performance assessed according to grip strength, narrow walk speed, walking speed, and time to complete five repeated chair stands. Individual scores were converted to quintiles (worst=1 to best=5; unable to complete=0) and summed for an overall score (mean 11.6 ± 4.3, range, 1-20). MetS was defined according to World Health Organization criteria that include evidence of glucose dysregulation (insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, or hyperinsulinemia) and at least two additional characteristics: high blood pressure, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high triglycerides, obesity. Results: More than one-quarter (26.3%) of participants met criteria for MetS. In separate linear regression models, four of five MetS components were related to performance (P<.001); only high blood pressure was unrelated. Men with MetS had a 1.1-point lower performance score (mean 10.8, 95% confidence interval (CI)=10.6-11.0) than men without MetS (mean 11.9, 95% CI=11.8-12.0) (P<.001), adjusting for age, race, education, and site. With further covariate adjustment, this difference was reduced but remained significant (β=-0.78, P<.001). A graded association was observed between number of MetS components (0, 1, 2, or ≥3) and performance (P for trend <.001). Findings were similar excluding men with diabetes mellitus or obese men. Conclusion: Metabolic dysregulation is related to objectively assessed poorer physical performance in relatively healthy older men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1376-1384
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume59
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2011

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Osteoporotic Fractures
Linear Models
Diabetes Mellitus
Confidence Intervals
Hypertension
Hyperinsulinism
Hand Strength
LDL Cholesterol
HDL Cholesterol
Insulin Resistance
Triglycerides
Cohort Studies
Obesity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education
Glucose

Keywords

  • aged
  • men
  • metabolic syndrome
  • physical function
  • physical performance

Cite this

Metabolic syndrome and physical performance in elderly men : The osteoporotic fractures in men study. / Everson-Rose, Susan; Paudel, Misti; Taylor, Brent C; Dam, Tien; Cawthon, Peggy Mannen; Leblanc, Erin; Strotmeyer, Elsa S.; Cauley, Jane A.; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Ensrud, Kristine E.

In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Vol. 59, No. 8, 01.08.2011, p. 1376-1384.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Everson-Rose, Susan ; Paudel, Misti ; Taylor, Brent C ; Dam, Tien ; Cawthon, Peggy Mannen ; Leblanc, Erin ; Strotmeyer, Elsa S. ; Cauley, Jane A. ; Stefanick, Marcia L. ; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth ; Ensrud, Kristine E. / Metabolic syndrome and physical performance in elderly men : The osteoporotic fractures in men study. In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 2011 ; Vol. 59, No. 8. pp. 1376-1384.
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