Mental health service and provider preferences among american indians with type 2 diabetes

Benjamin D. Aronson, Michelle D Johnson-Jennings, Margarette L. Kading, Reid C. Smith, Melissa L Walls

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, we investigated mental health service and provider preferences of American Indian adults with type 2 diabetes from two tribes in the northern Midwest. Preferences were determined and compared by participant characteristics. After controlling for other factors, living on reservation lands was associated with increased odds of Native provider preference, and decreased odds of biomedical service preference. Anxiety also was associated with decreased odds of biomedical service preference. Spiritual activity engagement and past health care discrimination were associated with increased odds of traditional service preference. We discuss implications for the types of mental health services offered and characteristics of providers who are recruited for tribal communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-23
Number of pages23
JournalAmerican Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

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North American Indians
Mental Health Services
American Indian
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
chronic illness
health service
mental health
Population Groups
Anxiety
Delivery of Health Care
American Indians
Mental Health
Type 2 Diabetes
Health Services
ethnic group
discrimination
health care
anxiety
community

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Mental health service and provider preferences among american indians with type 2 diabetes. / Aronson, Benjamin D.; Johnson-Jennings, Michelle D; Kading, Margarette L.; Smith, Reid C.; Walls, Melissa L.

In: American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research, Vol. 23, No. 1, 01.01.2016, p. 1-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Aronson, Benjamin D. ; Johnson-Jennings, Michelle D ; Kading, Margarette L. ; Smith, Reid C. ; Walls, Melissa L. / Mental health service and provider preferences among american indians with type 2 diabetes. In: American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research. 2016 ; Vol. 23, No. 1. pp. 1-23.
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