Mental health of rural young adults: Prevalence of psychiatric disorders, comorbidity, and service utilization

Martha A. Rueter, Kristen E. Holm, Rebecca Burzette, Kee Jeong Kim, Rand D. Conger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Few studies estimate rural psychiatric disorder rates. No study has reported either DSM-III-R or DSM IV disorder prevalence and mental health service use among US rural young adults. This paper reports psychiatric disorder prevalence, comorbidity, service utilization, and disorder correlates in a community sample of 536 young adults, aged 19 to 23 years, living in the rural Midwestern US. More than 60% of the sample met criteria for a lifetime disorder. Substance use disorders were most prevalent. Results indicate that young adults living in the rural Midwest demonstrate substantial rates of psychiatric disorder that are comparable to other population groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)229-249
Number of pages21
JournalCommunity Mental Health Journal
Volume43
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2007

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research is currently supported by grants from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the National Institute of Mental Health (HD047573, HD051746, and MH051361). Support for earlier years of the study also came from multiple sources, including the National Institute of Mental Health (MH00567, MH19734, MH43270, MH59355, MH62989, and MH48165), the National Institute on Drug Abuse (DA05347), the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (HD027724), the Bureau of Maternal and Child Health (MCJ-109572), and the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Successful Adolescent Development Among Youth in High-Risk Settings.

Keywords

  • Comorbidity
  • Prevalence
  • Psychiatric disorders
  • Rural Midwestern US
  • Service utilization

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