Medical ethics and the interrogation of Guantanamo 063

Steven H. Miles

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

The controversy over abusive interrogations of prisoners during the war against terrorism spotlights the need for clear ethics norms requiring physicians and other clinicians to prevent the mistreatment of prisoners. Although policies and general descriptions pertaining to clinical oversight of interrogations in United States' war on terror prisons have come to light, there are few public records detailing the clinical oversight of an interrogation. A complaint by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) led to an Army investigation of an interrogation at the United States prison at Guantanamo Bay. The declassified Army investigation and the corresponding interrogation log show clinical supervision, monitoring and treatment during an interrogation that employed dogs, prolonged sleep deprivation, humiliation, restraint, hypothermia and compulsory intravenous infusions. The interrogation and the involvement of a psychologist, physician and medics violate international and medical norms for the treatment of prisoners.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5-11
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Bioethics
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2007

Keywords

  • Human rights
  • Medical ethics
  • Military medicine
  • War

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