Mechanisms of morphology development and control in polymer-polymer blends

Christopher W. Macosko

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Polymer-polymer blends continue to be the most important method for achieving optimization of properties in plastics products. Over 30% of all plastics are blends. While miscible blends generally give average properties between the components, immiscible blends offer synergistic possibilities such as high modulus with high toughness; high flow with high impact strength or diffusion barriers with good mechanical properties and low cost. The key to performance of these immiscible blends is their morphology. There are several important types of morphology which can lead to valuable property improvement: emulsion - small polymer spheres well dispersed in a polymer matrix: double emulsion - spheres inside spheres which are dispersed in another matrix: microlayer - thin, parallel layers of one polymer in a matrix: cocontinuous - two (or more) continuous, interpenetrating polymer phases. To be economical it is desirable to create these morphologies via melt mixing of powder or pellets in conventional compounding equipment. The melting stage during compounding is very important for morphology development. This presentation will demonstrate the role of melting or softening of each phase as well as their viscosity, elasticity and interfacial tension in morphology development. Interfacial modification with premade block copolymers or reactively formed copolymers can greatly alter morphology formation and stability. Experimental results will be presented which quantify the role of these additives.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAnnual Technical Conference - ANTEC, Conference Proceedings
Editors Anon
PublisherSoc Plast Eng
Pages2548-2549
Number of pages2
Volume2
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998
EventProceedings of the 1998 56th Annual Technical Conference, ANTEC. Part 1 (of 3) - Atlanta, GA, USA
Duration: Apr 26 1998Apr 30 1998

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1998 56th Annual Technical Conference, ANTEC. Part 1 (of 3)
CityAtlanta, GA, USA
Period4/26/984/30/98

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