Mechanically robust and reprocessable imine exchange networks from modular polyester pre-polymers

Rachel L. Snyder, Claire A.L. Lidston, Guilhem X. De Hoe, Maria J.S. Parvulescu, Marc A. Hillmyer, Geoffrey W. Coates

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Covalent adaptable networks (CANs) containing reversible cross-links impart recyclability to thermoset materials without sacrificing their desirable properties (e.g. high tensile strength and solvent resistance). In addition to thermal recycling, the sustainability of these materials may be further improved by incorporating bio-sourced monomers or by enabling alternate end-of-life fates, such as biodegradation or recovery of starting materials. The alternating ring-opening copolymerisation of epoxides and cyclic anhydrides permits the modular synthesis of polyester pre-polymers that can then be cross-linked to form dynamic imine-linked networks. We report the synthesis and characterisation of five imine exchange polyester CANs with varied cross-linking densities and pre-polymer architectures. While the materials exhibit characteristic thermoset properties at service temperatures, differences in pre-polymer architecture produce distinct dynamic mechanical effects at elevated temperatures. The networks may be thermally reprocessed with full recovery of their tensile strengths and cross-linking densities, dissociated to pre-polymer, or hydrolytically degraded. This journal is

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5346-5355
Number of pages10
JournalPolymer Chemistry
Volume11
Issue number33
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 7 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We thank Stephanie Liffland for performing DMTA measurements of several materials. This research was supported by the Center for Sustainable Polymers-a National Science Foundation Center for Chemical Innovation (CHE-1901635), the University of Minnesota, and Cornell University. C. A. L. L. gratefully acknowledges a Graduate Research Fellowship from the National Science Foundation (DGE-1650441). G. X. D. gratefully acknowledges a University of Minnesota Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship. This work made use of the Cornell Center for Materials Research and the NMR Facility at Cornell University, which are supported by the NSF under awards DMR-1719875 and CHE-1531632, respectively.

Funding Information:
We thank Stephanie Liffland for performing DMTA measurements of several materials. This research was supported by the Center for Sustainable Polymers—a National Science Foundation Center for Chemical Innovation (CHE-1901635), the University of Minnesota, and Cornell University. C. A. L. L. gratefully acknowledges a Graduate Research Fellowship from the National Science Foundation (DGE-1650441). G. X. D. gratefully acknowledges a University of Minnesota Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship. This work made use of the Cornell Center for Materials Research and the NMR Facility at Cornell University, which are supported by the NSF under awards DMR-1719875 and CHE-1531632, respectively.

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Mechanically robust and reprocessable imine exchange networks from modular polyester pre-polymers'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this