Mechanical Stiffness Controls Dendritic Cell Metabolism and Function

Mainak Chakraborty, Kevin Chu, Annie Shrestha, Xavier S Revelo, Xiangyue Zhang, Matthew J Gold, Saad Khan, Megan Lee, Camille Huang, Masoud Akbari, Fanta Barrow, Yi Tao Chan, Helena Lei, Nicholas K Kotoulas, Juan Jovel, Chiara Pastrello, Max Kotlyar, Cynthia Goh, Evangelos Michelakis, Xavier Clemente-CasaresPamela S Ohashi, Edgar G Engleman, Shawn Winer, Igor Jurisica, Sue Tsai, Daniel A Winer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Stiffness in the tissue microenvironment changes in most diseases and immunological conditions, but its direct influence on the immune system is poorly understood. Here, we show that static tension impacts immune cell function, maturation, and metabolism. Bone-marrow-derived and/or splenic dendritic cells (DCs) grown in vitro at physiological resting stiffness have reduced proliferation, activation, and cytokine production compared with cells grown under higher stiffness, mimicking fibro-inflammatory disease. Consistently, DCs grown under higher stiffness show increased activation and flux of major glucose metabolic pathways. In DC models of autoimmune diabetes and tumor immunotherapy, tension primes DCs to elicit an adaptive immune response. Mechanistic workup identifies the Hippo-signaling molecule, TAZ, as well as Ca2+-related ion channels, including potentially PIEZO1, as important effectors impacting DC metabolism and function under tension. Tension also directs the phenotypes of monocyte-derived DCs in humans. Thus, mechanical stiffness is a critical environmental cue of DCs and innate immunity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number108609
Pages (from-to)108609
JournalCell reports
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 12 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We thank Dr. Darren Yuen for discussions in preparing the hydrogels, Dr. Battsetseg Batchuluun (Dr. Michael Wheeler Lab) for assistance with the calcium assays, and Christina Lam for assistance in processing tumor samples. The tetramers were supplied by the NIH Tetramer Core Facility. S.K. is a recipient of the Queen Elizabeth II Graduate Scholarship in Science and Technology (QEII-GSST)/Aventis Pasteur and the Banting and Best Diabetes Centre (BBDC)-Novo Nordisk Studentship. S.T. is a recipient of the National Research Council H.L. Holmes Postdoctoral Fellowship and a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Immunometabolism and Diabetes. She is funded by the Li Ka Shing Institute of Virology Bridge Fund and New Frontiers in Research-Exploration Fund . D.A.W. is funded by Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) New Investigator Foundation Grant FDN-148385 and the Huiying Memorial Foundation . D.A.W. has an Ontario Ministry of Innovation Early Researcher Award. Computational analyses (I.J.) were in part supported by the grants from the Ontario Research Fund ( 34876 ), Natural Sciences Research Council (NSERC; 203475 ), Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI; 29272 , 225404 , and 33536 ), Buchan Foundation , and IBM .

Funding Information:
We thank Dr. Darren Yuen for discussions in preparing the hydrogels, Dr. Battsetseg Batchuluun (Dr. Michael Wheeler Lab) for assistance with the calcium assays, and Christina Lam for assistance in processing tumor samples. The tetramers were supplied by the NIH Tetramer Core Facility. S.K. is a recipient of the Queen Elizabeth II Graduate Scholarship in Science and Technology (QEII-GSST)/Aventis Pasteur and the Banting and Best Diabetes Centre (BBDC)-Novo Nordisk Studentship. S.T. is a recipient of the National Research Council H.L. Holmes Postdoctoral Fellowship and a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Immunometabolism and Diabetes. She is funded by the Li Ka Shing Institute of Virology Bridge Fund and New Frontiers in Research-Exploration Fund. D.A.W. is funded by Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) New Investigator Foundation Grant FDN-148385 and the Huiying Memorial Foundation. D.A.W. has an Ontario Ministry of Innovation Early Researcher Award. Computational analyses (I.J.) were in part supported by the grants from the Ontario Research Fund (34876), Natural Sciences Research Council (NSERC; 203475), Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI; 29272, 225404, and 33536), Buchan Foundation, and IBM. S.T. M.C. K.C. A.S. X.S.R. X.Z. M.J.G. S.K. H.L. M.A. F.B. Y.T.C. N.K.K. X.C.-C. M.K. C.P. M.L. and C.H. performed experiments and analyzed and interpreted data. A.S. C.G. P.S.O. E.G.E. X.S.R. E.M. I.J. and S.W. provided feedback and supervised aspects of the study. S.W. and D.A.W. conceived the study. I.J. provided data analysis support. S.T. and D.A.W. contributed to the experimental design, analysis, and writing of the manuscript and supervised the overall implementation of the study. All authors contributed to revision of the manuscript. The authors declare no competing interests.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 The Author(s)

Keywords

  • danger signals
  • dendritic cells
  • immunometabolism
  • inflammation
  • innate immunity
  • mechanoimmunology
  • mechanosensing
  • PIEZO1
  • TAZ
  • tension

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Journal Article

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