Mechanical quantum sensing in the search for dark matter

D. Carney, G. Krnjaic, D. C. Moore, C. A. Regal, G. Afek, S. Bhave, B. Brubaker, T. Corbitt, J. Cripe, N. Crisosto, A. Geraci, S. Ghosh, J. G.E. Harris, A. Hook, E. W. Kolb, J. Kunjummen, R. F. Lang, T. Li, T. Lin, Z. LiuJ. Lykken, L. Magrini, J. Manley, N. Matsumoto, A. Monte, F. Monteiro, T. Purdy, C. J. Riedel, R. Singh, S. Singh, K. Sinha, J. M. Taylor, J. Qin, D. J. Wilson, Y. Zhao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

68 Scopus citations

Abstract

Numerous astrophysical and cosmological observations are best explained by the existence of dark matter, a mass density which interacts only very weakly with visible, baryonic matter. Searching for the extremely weak signals produced by this dark matter strongly motivate the development of new, ultra-sensitive detector technologies. Paradigmatic advances in the control and readout of massive mechanical systems, in both the classical and quantum regimes, have enabled unprecedented levels of sensitivity. In this white paper, we outline recent ideas in the potential use of a range of solid-state mechanical sensing technologies to aid in the search for dark matter in a number of energy scales and with a variety of coupling mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number024002
JournalQuantum Science and Technology
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2021
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We thank Charles W Clark, Yiwen Chu, Tom Lebrun, and Jon Pratt for comments, and Yoni Kahn and Masha Baryakhter for suggesting the relevance of the weak gravity conjecture in figure 2. Yogesh S S Patil, Lucy Yu, and Sean Frazier produced the images in figure 3. This white paper originated with a workshop held at the Joint Quantum Institute at the University of Maryland, October 28–29, 2019. This workshop was funded in part by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, through Grant GBMF6210. We also gratefully acknowledge support from the JQI (an NSF Physics Frontier Center, award number 1430094), and from JILA (an NSF PFC, award number 1734006) to run the workshop. We thank the Aspen Center for Physics for hospitality during the workshop ‘Quantum Information and Systems for Fundamental Physics’, where part of the writing was completed.

Funding Information:
We thank Charles W Clark, Yiwen Chu, Tom Lebrun, and Jon Pratt for comments, and Yoni Kahn and Masha Baryakhter for suggesting the relevance of the weak gravity conjecture in figure 2. Yogesh S S Patil, Lucy Yu, and Sean Frazier produced the images in figure 3. This white paper originated with a workshop held at the Joint Quantum Institute at the University of Maryland, October 28?29, 2019. This workshop was funded in part by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, through Grant GBMF6210. We also gratefully acknowledge support from the JQI (an NSF Physics Frontier Center, award number 1430094), and from JILA (an NSF PFC, award number 1734006) to run the workshop. We thank the Aspen Center for Physics for hospitality during the workshop ?Quantum Information and Systems for Fundamental Physics?, where part of the writing was completed.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 IOP Publishing Ltd.

Keywords

  • Dark matter
  • Optomechanics
  • Quantum sensing
  • Standard quantum limits

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