Mechanical properties, oxidation, and clinical performance of retrieved highly cross-linked crossfire liners after intermediate-term implantation

Steven M. Kurtz, Matthew S. Austin, Khalid Azzam, Peter F. Sharkey, Daniel W. MacDonald, Francisco J. Medel, William J. Hozack

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

54 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sixty Crossfire (Stryker Orthopaedics, Mahwah, NJ) liners were consecutively revised after an average of 2.9 years (range, 0.01-8.0 years) for reasons unrelated to wear or mechanical performance of the polyethylene. Femoral head penetration was measured directly from 42 retrievals implanted for more than 1 year. Penetration rate results (0.04 mm/y, on average; range, 0.00-0.13 mm/y) confirmed decreasing wear rates with longer in vivo times. Overall, we observed oxidation levels at the bearing surface of the 60 liners (0.5, on average; range, 0.1-1.7) comparable to those of nonimplanted liners (0.5, on average; range, 0.3-1.1) and preservation of mechanical properties. We also measured elevated oxidation of the rim (3.4, on average; range, 0.2-8.8) that was correlated with implantation time. Rim surface damage, however, was observed in only 3 (5%) of 60 cases. Retrieval analysis of the 3 rim-damaged liners did not reveal an association between surface damage and the reasons for revision.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)614-623.e2
JournalJournal of Arthroplasty
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2010
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Benefits or funds were received in partial or total support of the research material described in this article. Institutional support was received from National Institutes of Health grant R01 AR47904 and Stryker Orthopedics (Mahwah, NJ).

Funding Information:
Supported by NIH Grant R01 AR47904 and by a research grant from Stryker Orthopedics.

Keywords

  • Highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene
  • Hip arthroplasty
  • Mechanical properties
  • Oxidation
  • Wear

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