Measurement of pulmonary artery diastolic pressure from a right ventricular pressure transducer in patients with heart failure

Peter P. Chuang, Robert F. Wilson, David C. Romans, Karen Stone, Torrey Bergman, Tom D. Bennett, Spencer H. Kubo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

35 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recent studies have demonstrated that pulmonary artery diastolic (PAD) pressure can be measured from a transducer positioned in the right ventricle (RV) based on the finding that PAD and RV pressures are equal at the time of pulmonary valve opening, which is associated with the time of maximum positive rate of pressure development (dP/dtmax) in the ventricle. The objective of this study was to assess the correlation between estimated PAD (ePAD) pressure, obtained through a RV transducer, and actual PAD (aPAD) pressure in patients with heart failure who have abnormal hemodynamics, reduced systolic function, and variable degrees of mitral regurgitation (MR) and tricuspid regurgitation (TR). Simultaneous measurements of pulmonary artery and RV pressures were obtained with a high-fidelity Millar catheter (Millar Instruments, Houston, TX) in 10 patients with New York Heart Association class III-IV heart failure who were being evaluated for cardiac transplantation. The overall correlation between ePAD and aPAD pressures was .92 (R2 = .878). This was not significantly different during the Valsalva maneuver (r = .96, R2 = .943), submaximal bicycle exercise (r = .87, R2 = .756), or infusions of dobutamine and nitroglycerin (r = .82, R2 = .730). The overall average difference between the average ePAD (24.6 ± 7.0 mmHg) and aPAD (23.6 ± 7.0 mmHg) pressures was 1.0 ± 3.4 mmHg. The average difference between the two pressures in patients with mild to severe MR or TR was not different compared to those patients with no or trace MR or TR. The estimation of PAD pressure from an RV transducer is valid in patients with heart failure who have abnormal hemodynamics, reduced systolic function, and variable degrees of MR and TR. This correlation was observed at rest and during several provocative maneuvers. These data will be important for the development of a chronic, implantable hemodynamic monitor for patients with heart failure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-46
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of cardiac failure
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Supported in part by a grant from Medtronic, Inc. Dr. Kubo is a consultant to Medtronic, Inc. All editorial decisions for this article, including selection of reviewers, were made by a Guest Editor. This policy applies to all articles with authors from the Universityo f Minnesota. Manuscript received Nov. 10, 1995; received in revised form Jan. 22, 1996; accepted in revised form Feb. 5, 1996. Reprint requests: Spencer H. Kubo, MD, Cardiovascular Division, Box 508 UMHC, Universityo f Minnesota, Minneapolis,M N 55455.

Copyright:
Copyright 2017 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Maximum rate of pressure (dP/dt)
  • Mitral regurgitation
  • Tricuspid regurgitation

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