Maturation of tergal gland alkene profiles in European honey bee queens, Apis mellifera L.

Roy Keith Smith, Marla Spivak, Orley R. Taylor, Clayton Bennett, Michelle L. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

In a series of husbandry and stop-time chemical experiments with honey bee queens, the production of tergal gland alkenes was found to be stimulated by natural mating and not by instrumental insemination. Carbon dioxide, physical manipulation of the sting chamber and vagina, presence of sperm in the spermatheca, egg production, and chemicals transferred via drone semen are demonstrated to not initiate the synthesis of the tergal gland alkenes. The compounds probably do not function as sex pheromones. However, the circumstances and timing of the initiation of production of the tergal gland alkenes strongly suggests a communication role for the compounds within the hive.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)133-142
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Chemical Ecology
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

Keywords

  • Apidae
  • Hydrocarbons
  • Hymenoptera
  • chemical communication
  • communication
  • exocrine glands
  • gas chromatography
  • honey bees
  • insects
  • instrumental insemination
  • mating
  • natural mating
  • pheromones

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Maturation of tergal gland alkene profiles in European honey bee queens, Apis mellifera L.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this