Mathematical modeling of suspended solids and particulate phosphorus transport in farm conveyance systems of the everglades agricultural area

James D. Stuck, Forrest T. Izuno, Nigel Pickering, Kenneth L. Campbell, Adelbert B. Bottcher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA) is one of several large tracts of the original Everglades that were channelized and drained for development. Drainage waters from the agricultural lands in the EAA contribute nutrients, primarily phosphorus, to downstream regions, including Everglades National Park. The growers in the EAA are participating in a major program to implement agricultural management practices that minimize the nutrient load attributed to their discharge waters. Farm- and basin-scale studies showed that the bulk of exported particulate phosphorus (PP) originates from biotic material growing in farm canals. This was contrary to previous assumptions that soil erosion was the primary PP contributor. Computer modeling of PP transport can allow economical evaluation of various control schemes. Such an effort requires a mathematical model that accurately describes the spatial and temporal variation of the biologically sourced suspended solids encountered in the EAA. This work presents a lumped-parameter mathematical model that describes sourcing, mobilization, transport, and demobilization of phosphorus-containing organic matter on the farm scale. The model was calibrated and validated on a 518-ha sugarcane farm in the EAA. It was then used to evaluate several typical management practices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1117-1126
Number of pages10
JournalTransactions of the American Society of Agricultural Engineers
Volume44
Issue number5
StatePublished - 2001

Keywords

  • Drainage
  • Everglades Agricultural Area
  • Mathematical model
  • Particulate phosphorus
  • Water quality

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