Maternal immunity to infectious bovine rhinotracheitis and bovine viral diarrhea viruses: duration and effect on vaccination in young calves.

J. S. Brar, D. W. Johnson, C. C. Muscoplat, R. E. Shope, J. C. Meiske

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

53 Scopus citations

Abstract

The immune response to modified live-virus bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) vaccine and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) vaccine was examined in calves that had received passive maternal antibodies to these viruses. Blood serum samples from vaccinated and control (nonvaccinated) calves were examined for more than 1 year to determine the rate of decline of passive anti-BVD and anti-IBR antibodies and the effect that vaccination had on these antibody titers. The control calves lost their antibodies to BVD and IBR viruses at the rate of one half their remaining antibody titer every 21 days. Calves serologically responded to BVD vaccine at a time when maternal antibody titers remained between 1:96 and 1:20. However, animals did not seroconvert to the IBR vaccine until maternal antibodies had decreased and become undetectable. Evidence is presented to show that although passive immunity will inhibit IBR vaccination, priming for a secondary response will occur so that on subsequent vaccination, at a time when maternal antibodies have disappeared, the animals will respond anamnestically to IBR vaccination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)241-244
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican journal of veterinary research
Volume39
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1 1978

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