Maternal and paternal occupational exposures and hepatoblastoma: Results from the HOPE study through the Children's Oncology Group

Amanda E. Janitz, Gurumurthy Ramachandran, Gail E. Tomlinson, Mark Krailo, Michaela Richardson, Logan Spector

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Little is known about the etiology of hepatoblastoma. We aimed to confirm the results of a previous study evaluating the association between parental occupational exposures and hepatoblastoma. In our case-control study, we identified cases (n=383) from the Children's Oncology Group and controls from birth certificates (n=387), which were frequency matched to cases on year and region of birth, sex, and birth weight. Occupational exposure in the year before and during the index pregnancy was collected through maternal interview and analyzed using unconditional logistic regression. The odds of both paternal and maternal "Likely" exposure to paints was elevated among cases compared with controls (paternal odds ratio (OR): 1.71, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04, 2.81; maternal OR: 3.29, 95% CI: 0.32, 33.78) after adjustment for matching factors and the confounding factors of maternal race (maternal only) and household income. In addition, paternal exposure to other chemicals was also elevated when adjusting for matching factors only (OR: 1.53, 95% CI: 1.02, 2.30). The results of our study provide further evidence of an association between parental occupation and hepatoblastoma. These results warrant further investigation of the etiologically relevant timing of occupational exposure to fumes and chemicals related to hepatoblastoma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)359-364
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

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Paternal Exposure
Hepatoblastoma
Oncology
Occupational Exposure
Mothers
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Fumes
Birth Certificates
Maternal Exposure
Paint
Logistics
Occupations
Birth Weight
Case-Control Studies
Logistic Models
Parturition
Interviews
Pregnancy
Control Groups

Keywords

  • cancer
  • child exposure/health
  • epidemiology

Cite this

Maternal and paternal occupational exposures and hepatoblastoma : Results from the HOPE study through the Children's Oncology Group. / Janitz, Amanda E.; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Krailo, Mark; Richardson, Michaela; Spector, Logan.

In: Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology, Vol. 27, No. 4, 01.07.2017, p. 359-364.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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