Masters of the universe

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Feminist scholars, urban and otherwise, have painstakingly illustrated the way in which how we know is intimately related to what we can know, and that these knoweldges are always socially, institutionally, and geographically situated. The making and traveling of these knowledges is itself political, as are the vantage points purported to be achieved in various epistemological frameworks. The emergence of the planetary urbanization thesis takes on a particular and interesting valence when read against this body of feminist work and scholarship. In this commentary, I argue that the planetary urbanization thesis inverts the feminist intervention, coopting feminist conceptions of relationality and hybridity while evacuating them of their political – and, crucially, their epistemological – force.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)556-562
Number of pages7
JournalEnvironment and Planning D: Society and Space
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018

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Masters of the universe. / Derickson, Kate D.

In: Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, Vol. 36, No. 3, 01.06.2018, p. 556-562.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

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