Marital and family satisfaction as a function of work-family demands and community resources: Individual- and couple-level analyses

Andrew J. Hostetler, Stephan Desrochers, Kimberly Kopko, Phyllis Moen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study uses individual- and couple-level analyses to examine the influence of work-family demands and community resources on marital and family satisfaction within a sample of dual-earner parents with dependent children (N = 260 couples, 520 individuals). Total couple work hours were strongly negatively associated with marital satisfaction for both fathers and mothers. Work hours may be best studied as a couple-level demand, and working shorter combined hours, if possible, may be a central component of a broader adaptive strategy. Negative work-to-family spillover was negatively associated with parents' family satisfaction, but for mothers this relationship was mediated by negative affect and (marginally) by couple disagreements. Finally, fathers' neighborhood friends emerged as an important resource for both fathers and mothers, suggesting gender differences in the role of community in the work-family interface and highlighting the need for further research of community-level resources.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)316-340
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Family Issues
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2012

Keywords

  • adaptive strategies
  • community
  • ecological systems
  • family satisfaction
  • gender differences
  • marital satisfaction
  • neighborhood
  • work-family

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