Managers’ Political Beliefs and Gender Inequality among Subordinates

Does His Ideology Matter More Than Hers?

Seth Carnahan, Brad N Greenwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To explore whether managers’ beliefs and attitudes influence gender inequality among their subordinates, we theorize about the relationship between managers’ political ideology, situated on a liberal–conservative continuum, and differences in the hiring, work team selection, and promotion of male versus female subordinates, as well as how a manager’s gender moderates this relationship. We analyze novel microdata from the U.S. legal industry from 2007 to 2012 and find that large law offices whose partners are more liberal hire a larger percentage of female associates, that more-liberal partners are more likely to select female associates to be members of their client teams, and that associates whose supervising partners are more liberal have greater gender parity in promotion rates. Further, we find that the ideology of male partners is significantly more influential than the ideology of female partners in affecting these differences. We find little evidence that sorting on the part of higher-quality female associates drives the results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)287-322
Number of pages36
JournalAdministrative Science Quarterly
Volume63
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018

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ideology
manager
gender
promotion
political ideology
hiring
Law
industry
evidence
Ideology
Gender Inequality
Managers
Associates

Keywords

  • employment relation
  • gender
  • inequality
  • labor markets
  • law firms

Cite this

Managers’ Political Beliefs and Gender Inequality among Subordinates : Does His Ideology Matter More Than Hers? / Carnahan, Seth; Greenwood, Brad N.

In: Administrative Science Quarterly, Vol. 63, No. 2, 01.06.2018, p. 287-322.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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