Management of type 2 diabetes in youth: An update

Kevin Peterson, Janet Silverstein, Francine Kaufman, Elizabeth Warren-Boulton

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although type 1 diabetes historically has been more common in patients eight to 19 years of age, type 2 diabetes is emerging as an important disease in this group. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 8 to 45 percent of new childhood diabetes. This article is an update from the National Diabetes Education Program on the management of type 2 diabetes in youth. Highrisk youths older than 10 years have a body mass index greater than the 85th percentile for age and sex plus two additional risk factors (i.e., family history, high-risk ethnicity, acanthosis nigricans, polycystic ovary syndrome, hypertension, or dyslipidemia). Reducing overweight and impaired glucose tolerance with increased physical activity and healthier eating habits may help prevent or delay the development of type 2 diabetes in high-risk youths. The American Academy of Pediatrics does not recommend population-based screening of high-risk youths; however, physicians should closely monitor these patients because early diagnosis may be beneficial. The American Diabetes Association recommends screening high-risk youths every two years with a fasting plasma glucose test. Patients diagnosed with diabetes should receive self-management education, behavior interventions to promote healthy eating and physical activity, appropriate therapy for hyperglycemia (usually metformin and insulin), and treatment of comorbidities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)658-666
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican family physician
Volume76
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 1 2007

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Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Exercise
Acanthosis Nigricans
Education
Glucose Intolerance
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Metformin
Feeding Behavior
Self Care
Dyslipidemias
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Hyperglycemia
Comorbidity
Early Diagnosis
Fasting
Body Mass Index
Insulin
Pediatrics
Hypertension
Physicians

Cite this

Peterson, K., Silverstein, J., Kaufman, F., & Warren-Boulton, E. (2007). Management of type 2 diabetes in youth: An update. American family physician, 76(5), 658-666.

Management of type 2 diabetes in youth : An update. / Peterson, Kevin; Silverstein, Janet; Kaufman, Francine; Warren-Boulton, Elizabeth.

In: American family physician, Vol. 76, No. 5, 01.09.2007, p. 658-666.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Peterson, K, Silverstein, J, Kaufman, F & Warren-Boulton, E 2007, 'Management of type 2 diabetes in youth: An update', American family physician, vol. 76, no. 5, pp. 658-666.
Peterson K, Silverstein J, Kaufman F, Warren-Boulton E. Management of type 2 diabetes in youth: An update. American family physician. 2007 Sep 1;76(5):658-666.
Peterson, Kevin ; Silverstein, Janet ; Kaufman, Francine ; Warren-Boulton, Elizabeth. / Management of type 2 diabetes in youth : An update. In: American family physician. 2007 ; Vol. 76, No. 5. pp. 658-666.
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