Management factors affecting trichinosis seropositivity among 91 North Carolina swine farms

P. Cowen, R. A. Pacer, P. N. Van Peteghem, John Fetrow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Results of a prevalence survey for trichinosis, using a commercial kit adaption of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) serological test, were used to classify herds as seropositive or seronegative. The herds owners were then interviewed using a questionnaire to ascertain 85 specific management practices. Of 153 herds serotested, 91 owners completed the questionnaire. At the 6% ELISA-positive classification level, 1.22% of pigs, 41.7% of the shipment lots and 56% of the farms were seropositive, while the 15% ELISA classification level indicated only 0.48% of pigs, 22.4% of shipment lots and 35% of farms to be seropositive. Results of logistic regression analyses indicated that the access of cats to the swine houses, the purchase of gilts from commercial companies, tail biting, and the presence of wildlife (opossums and skunks) on the farm were related to serological status at the 6% ELISA level of testing. The access of cats to the swine houses, tail biting, and the importance the owner placed on trichinosis testing were related to serological status at the 15% ELISA level of testing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)165-172
Number of pages8
JournalPreventive Veterinary Medicine
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1990

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