Making “Time” for Preventive Services

THOMAS E. KOTTKE, MILO L. BREKKE, LEIF I. SOLBERG

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

160 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although the implementation of clinical preventive services is a high priority on the national agenda and physicians acknowledge the importance of these services, implementation rates remain far below the target years after the recommendations have been released. Physicians repeatedly report that the reason for not providing preventive services is that they do not have “time.” In this article, we identify attributes of the health-services system that create this phenomenon. We present evidence that formal delivery systems for preventive services must be developed if the “time” problem is to be solved, and we review why preventive-services systems need to be integrated into the current health-services system. Finally, we list the attributes that we believe a preventive-services system must have if it is to be successful. The success of clinical trials of such systems indicates that our goals of preventive services can be achieved if all persons who have an investment in clinical preventive services commit themselves to developing and supporting these systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)785-791
Number of pages7
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume68
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported in part by Grants CA 38361, HL 00662, and CA 15083 from the National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service.

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