Majority group perceptions of criminal behavior: The accuracy of race-related crime stereotypes

Randall A. Gordon, Jennifer L. Michels, Caroline L. Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

Majority group perceptions regarding the relative frequency of crimes committed by various races and ethnic groups were examined. White-collar crimes such as embezzlement and fraud were ranked as more common for White criminals, and blue-collar crimes such as aggravated assault and motor vehicle theft were ranked as more common for Black criminals. Perceptions were subsequently compared with data from the Uniform Crime Reports for the U.S. (U.S. Department of Justice, 1992). As a function of overestimating the number of white-collar crimes and underestimating the number of blue-collar and violent crimes committed by Whites, majority group subjects held somewhat more accurate perceptions of minority groups than of their own group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)148-159
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 16 1996

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