Magnetic resonance imaging: Chemical-shift imaging: An introduction to its theory and practice

Xiaoping Hu, Wei Chen, Maqbool Patel, Kamil Ugurbil

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a clinically important medical imaging modality due to its exceptional soft-tissue contrast. MRI was invented in the early 1970s [1]. The first commercial scanners appeared about 10 years later. Noninvasive MRI studies are now supplanting many conventional invasive procedures. A 1990 study [2] found that the principal applications for MRI are examinations of the head (40%), spine (33%), bone and joints (17%), and the body (10%). The percentage of bone and joint studies was growing in 1990.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMedical Imaging
Subtitle of host publicationPrinciples and Practices
PublisherCRC Press
Pages3-31-3-37
ISBN (Electronic)9781439871034
ISBN (Print)9781439871027
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint

Magnetic resonance imaging
chemical equilibrium
magnetic resonance
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
bones
Bone
Bone and Bones
spine
Medical imaging
Diagnostic Imaging
scanners
Spine
Joints
examination
Head
Tissue

Cite this

Hu, X., Chen, W., Patel, M., & Ugurbil, K. (2012). Magnetic resonance imaging: Chemical-shift imaging: An introduction to its theory and practice. In Medical Imaging: Principles and Practices (pp. 3-31-3-37). CRC Press. https://doi.org/10.1201/b12939

Magnetic resonance imaging : Chemical-shift imaging: An introduction to its theory and practice. / Hu, Xiaoping; Chen, Wei; Patel, Maqbool; Ugurbil, Kamil.

Medical Imaging: Principles and Practices. CRC Press, 2012. p. 3-31-3-37.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Hu, Xiaoping ; Chen, Wei ; Patel, Maqbool ; Ugurbil, Kamil. / Magnetic resonance imaging : Chemical-shift imaging: An introduction to its theory and practice. Medical Imaging: Principles and Practices. CRC Press, 2012. pp. 3-31-3-37
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