Low rates of alcohol and tobacco use, strong cultural ties for Native American college students in the Southwest

Brenna L Greenfield, Kamilla L. Venner, J. Scott Tonigan, Monika Honeyestewa, Homer Hubbell, Dorothea Bluehorse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: College attendance is associated with an increased risk for substance use yet we know little about substance use among Native American college students and its regional variation. This study examined alcohol, tobacco, and drug use and their relation to gender, institution, age, and cultural involvement among Native American college students in the Southwest. Methods: Native American community college and university students in a large Southwest city (N = 347) completed an online survey about past-month and lifetime substance use and involvement in cultural activities. Results: Cultural involvement was related to less past-month substance use. In the past month, 43% drank alcohol, 27% binge drank, 20% used drugs, and 13% were current smokers. Males, community college students, and older individuals were more likely to have a positive CAGE-AID and have used drugs more than 100 times. Younger individuals were more likely to use marijuana in the past month. Conclusions: These findings highlight cultural strengths and comparatively low rates of tobacco and alcohol use among Native American college students in the Southwest.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)122-128
Number of pages7
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume82
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2018

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Tobacco
North American Indians
Tobacco Use
Alcohols
Students
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Cannabis
Interpersonal Relations

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • American Indian/Alaska Native
  • College
  • Culture
  • Drug
  • Tobacco

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Low rates of alcohol and tobacco use, strong cultural ties for Native American college students in the Southwest. / Greenfield, Brenna L; Venner, Kamilla L.; Tonigan, J. Scott; Honeyestewa, Monika; Hubbell, Homer; Bluehorse, Dorothea.

In: Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 82, 01.07.2018, p. 122-128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Greenfield, Brenna L ; Venner, Kamilla L. ; Tonigan, J. Scott ; Honeyestewa, Monika ; Hubbell, Homer ; Bluehorse, Dorothea. / Low rates of alcohol and tobacco use, strong cultural ties for Native American college students in the Southwest. In: Addictive Behaviors. 2018 ; Vol. 82. pp. 122-128.
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