Low-frequency tilt seismology with a precision ground-rotation sensor

M. P. Ross, K. Venkateswara, C. A. Hagedorn, J. H. Gundlach, J. S. Kissel, J. Warner, H. Radkins, T. J. Shaffer, M. W. Coughlin, P. Bodin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

We describe measurements of the rotational component of teleseismic surface waves using an inertial high-precision ground-rotation sensor installed at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) Hanford Observatory (LHO). The sensor has a noise floor of 0:4 nrad= Hz p at 50 mHz and a translational coupling of less than 1 μrad=m enabling translation-free measurement of small rotations. We present observations of the rotational motion from Rayleigh waves of six teleseismic events from varied locations and with magnitudes ranging from M 6.7 to 7.9. These events were used to estimate phase dispersion curves that show agreement with a similar analysis done with an array of three STS-2 seismometers also located at LHO.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)67-76
Number of pages10
JournalSeismological Research Letters
Volume89
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was carried out at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) Hanford Observatory (LHO) by members of LIGO laboratory and the LIGO Scientific Collaboration including University of Washington, Seattle, and Harvard University. LIGO was constructed by the California Institute of Technology and Massachusetts Institute of Technology with funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and operates under Cooperative Agreement PHY-0757058. Advanced LIGO was built under Award PHY-0823459. This document has been assigned LIGO Lab-

Funding Information:
oratory document number LIGO-P1700149. Participation from the University of Washington, Seattle, was supported by funding from the NSF under Awards PHY-1306613 and PHY-1607385.

Funding Information:
Participation from the University of Washington, Seattle, was supported by funding from the NSF under Awards PHY-1306613 and PHY-1607385.

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