Longitudinal study of urban American Indian 12-step attendance, attrition, and outcome

J. Scott Tonigan, Brenda Martinez-Papponi, Kylee J. Hagler, Brenna L. Greenfield, Kamilla L. Venner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Strong opinions have been voiced about the "fit" between 12-step treatment, community-based 12-step practices, and American Indian beliefs and values. Little is known, however, about the relative benefit of 12-step programs for urban American Indians, although they are the most widely accessed type of treatment by American Indians. This study investigated rates of 12-step attendance, attrition, and substance use outcomes for American Indians for 9 months relative to non-Hispanic White participants. Method: This study compared urban American Indian (n = 63) and non-Hispanic White (n = 133) 12-step attendance, attrition, and substance use over 9 months. The sample was formed by merging data from two prospective single-group longitudinal studies investigating behavior change in community-based 12-step programs. Participants were interviewed at baseline and at 3-, 6-, and 9-month follow-ups. No intervention was provided. Participants were recruited from Alcoholics Anonymous meetings in the community and as they presented for outpatient substance use disorder treatment. Substance use and patterns of 12-step attendance were measured using the Form 90 calendar-based interview, and the General Alcoholics Anonymous Tools of Recovery was administered to assess the adoption of prescribed 12-step practices and beliefs. Results: Trajectories in 12- step meeting attendance over 9 months did not differ between American Indian and non-Hispanic White participants. However, American Indian participants discontinued 12-step attendance significantly less often than non-Hispanic White participants. Higher rates of 12-step attendance predicted increased alcohol abstinence and decreased drinking intensity for both American Indian and non-Hispanic White participants. Twelve-step attendance was unrelated to later illicit drug use for both American Indian and non-Hispanic White participants. Conclusions: Community-based 12-step program attendance is associated with drinking reductions among urban American Indians.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)514-520
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs
Volume74
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jul 1 2013

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North American Indians
Street Drugs
American Indian
Merging
Longitudinal Studies
longitudinal study
Trajectories
Alcohols
Recovery
Alcoholics Anonymous
alcoholism
Drinking
community
Alcohol Abstinence
study behavior
Substance-Related Disorders
drug use
Outpatients
Therapeutics
alcohol

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Scott Tonigan, J., Martinez-Papponi, B., Hagler, K. J., Greenfield, B. L., & Venner, K. L. (2013). Longitudinal study of urban American Indian 12-step attendance, attrition, and outcome. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 74(4), 514-520.

Longitudinal study of urban American Indian 12-step attendance, attrition, and outcome. / Scott Tonigan, J.; Martinez-Papponi, Brenda; Hagler, Kylee J.; Greenfield, Brenna L.; Venner, Kamilla L.

In: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, Vol. 74, No. 4, 01.07.2013, p. 514-520.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Scott Tonigan, J, Martinez-Papponi, B, Hagler, KJ, Greenfield, BL & Venner, KL 2013, 'Longitudinal study of urban American Indian 12-step attendance, attrition, and outcome', Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, vol. 74, no. 4, pp. 514-520.
Scott Tonigan, J. ; Martinez-Papponi, Brenda ; Hagler, Kylee J. ; Greenfield, Brenna L. ; Venner, Kamilla L. / Longitudinal study of urban American Indian 12-step attendance, attrition, and outcome. In: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. 2013 ; Vol. 74, No. 4. pp. 514-520.
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