Longitudinal comparison of three depression measures in adult cancer patients

Shelley A. Johns, Kurt Kroenke, Erin E. Krebs, Dale E. Theobald, Jingwei Wu, Wanzhu Tu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Context: Although a number of depression measures have been used with cancer patients, longitudinal comparisons of several measures in the same patient population have been infrequently reported. Objectives: To compare the Hopkins Symptom Checklist 20-item depression scale, Short-Form 36 Mental Health Inventory five-item distress scale, and Patient Health Questionnaire nine-item depression scale in adults with cancer. Methods: Of the 309 cancer patients enrolled in a telecare management trial for depression, 247 completed the three depression measures at both baseline and at three months and a retrospective assessment of global rating of change in depression at three months. Internal consistency and construct validity of each measure were evaluated. Responsiveness was compared by calculating standardized response means and receiver operating characteristic area under the curve, using global rating of change as the external comparator measure. Differences between intervention and control groups in depression change scores were compared by calculating standardized effect sizes (SESs). Results: Internal reliability coefficients for the three measures were ≥0.77 at baseline and ≥0.84 at three months. Construct validity was supported with strong correlations of the depression measures among themselves, moderately strong correlations with other measures of mental health, and moderate correlations with vitality and disability. In terms of responsiveness, standardized response means for all measures significantly differentiated between three groups (improved, unchanged, and worse) as classified by patient-reported global rating of change in depression at three months. The three measures were able to detect a modest treatment effect in the intervention group compared with the control group (SES ranging from 0.21 to 0.43) in the full sample, whereas detecting a greater treatment effect in depressed participants with comorbid pain (SES ranging from 0.30 to 0.58). Finally, the three measures performed similarly in detecting patients with improvement. Conclusion: The Hopkins Symptom Checklist 20-item depression scale, Mental Health Inventory five-item distress scale, and Patient Health Questionnaire nine-item depression scale were established as reliable, valid, and responsive depression measures in adults with cancer. Given the current recommendations for measurement-based care, our study shows that clinicians treating depressed cancer patients have several measures from which to choose.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)71-82
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Pain and Symptom Management
Volume45
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2013
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was supported by grants from the National Cancer Institute to Dr. Kroenke ( R01 CA-115369 ) and Dr. Johns ( R25 CA-117865 ) as well as a training grant to Dr. Johns from the Walther Cancer Foundation, Inc. Dr. Krebs's work on this manuscript was supported by a Career Development Award from the Department of Veterans Affairs, Health Services Research and Development. The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the Department of Veterans Affairs or the U.S. government. Dr. Kroenke has received honoraria as a consultant to Eli Lilly and Forest Pharmaceuticals. The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • HSCL-20
  • MHI-5
  • PHQ-9
  • assessment
  • depression
  • psychometrics
  • responsiveness

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