Longitudinal Care Improves Cessation in Smokers Who Do Not Initially Respond to Treatment by Increasing Cessation Self-Efficacy, Satisfaction, and Readiness to Quit: A Mediated Moderation Analysis

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Abstract

Background: The Tobacco Longitudinal Care study was a randomized controlled trial for smoking cessation. It demonstrated that longitudinal care for smoking cessation, in which telephone-based counseling and nicotine replacement therapy were offered for 12 months, was more effective than the standard 8-week treatment. Purpose: This study aims to identify for whom and how longitudinal care increased the likelihood of abstinence. Methods: Mediated moderation analyses were utilized across three time points. Results: There was a trend towards smokers who did not respond to treatment (i.e., were still smoking) by 21 days being more likely to be abstinent at 6 months if they received longitudinal care rather than usual care. Similarly, those who did not respond to treatment by 3 months were more likely to be abstinent at 12 months if they received longitudinal care. At both time points, the likelihood of abstinence did not differ across treatment conditions among participants who responded to treatment (i.e., quit smoking). The effect on 6-month outcomes was mediated by satisfaction and readiness to quit. Cessation self-efficacy, satisfaction, and readiness to quit mediated the effect on 12-month outcomes. The effect of treatment condition on the likelihood of abstinence at 18 months was not moderated by response to treatment at 6 months. Conclusions: Smokers who did not respond to initial treatment benefited from longitudinal care. Differential effects of treatment condition were not observed among those who responded to early treatment. Conditional assignment to longitudinal care may be useful. Determining for whom and how interventions work over time will advance theory and practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)58-69
Number of pages12
JournalAnnals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume50
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was funded by the Transdisciplinary Tobacco Use Research Center (TTURC) on Tobacco Exposure Reduction, NCI/NIDA: P50 DA01333. This material is the result of work supported in part with resources and the use of facilities at the Minneapolis VA HSR&D Center for Chronic Disease Outcomes Research. The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the Department of Veterans Affairs or the United States government.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015, The Society of Behavioral Medicine.

Keywords

  • Longitudinal care
  • Mediated moderation
  • Smoking cessation

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