Long-Term Follow-Up of Patients With Ventilator-Dependent High Tetraplegia Managed With Diaphragmatic Pacing Systems

Kimberley R. Monden, Jennifer Coker, Susan Charlifue, Stephanie J. Bennett, Christina Draganich, David Coons, Ralph J. Marino, Jeffrey Berliner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To explore participants’ experiences after implantation of a diaphragmatic pacing system (DPS). Design: Cross-sectional, observational study using self-report questionnaires. Setting: Participants were recruited from 6 Spinal Cord Injury Model System centers across the United States (Craig Hospital, CO; Jefferson/Magee Rehabilitation Hospital, PA; Kessler Rehabilitation Center, NJ; University of Miami, FL; The Shirly Ryan Ability Lab, IL; Shepherd Center, GA). Interventions: Not applicable. Participants: Men and women (N=28) with tetraplegia were enrolled in the study between November 2012 and January 2015. Main Outcome Measures: Participants completed self-report questionnaires focused on their DPS usage and mechanical ventilation, as well as their experiences and satisfaction with the DPS. Results: DPS is a well-tolerated and highly successful device to help individuals living with spinal cord injury who are dependent on ventilators achieve negative pressure, ventilator-free breathing. A small percentage of participants reported complications, including broken pacing wires and surgery to replace or reposition wires. Conclusions: This study provides insight into the usage patterns of DPS and both the potential negative and positive effects that DPS can have on the life of the user. Knowledge gained from this study can provide a foundation for further discussion about the benefits and potential risks of using a DPS to inform an individual's decision to pursue a DPS implant.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)773-778
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume103
Issue number4
Early online dateMar 22 2021
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Supported by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR, grant nos. 90SI5003 [formerly H133N110006] and 90SI15015 to the Rocky Mountain Regional Spinal Injury System; 90SI5024 [formerly H133N110021] to the Regional SCI Center of the Delaware Valley; 90SI5002 [formerly H133N110005] to the Southeastern Reginal Spinal Cord Injury Model System; 90SI5009 [formerly H133N110014] to the Midwest Regional Spinal Cord Injury Model System; 90SI5001 [formerly H133N110003] to the South Florida Spinal Cord Injury Model System; and 90SI5011 [formerly H133N110020] to the Northern New Jersey Spinal Cord Injury System). NIDILRR is a Center within the Administration for Community Living (ACL), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The contents of this manuscript do not necessarily represent the policy of the NIDILRR, ACL, or HHS, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.

Funding Information:
Supported by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR, grant nos. 90SI5003 [formerly H133N110006] and 90SI15015 to the Rocky Mountain Regional Spinal Injury System; 90SI5024 [formerly H133N110021] to the Regional SCI Center of the Delaware Valley; 90SI5002 [formerly H133N110005] to the Southeastern Reginal Spinal Cord Injury Model System; 90SI5009 [formerly H133N110014] to the Midwest Regional Spinal Cord Injury Model System; 90SI5001 [formerly H133N110003] to the South Florida Spinal Cord Injury Model System; and 90SI5011 [formerly H133N110020] to the Northern New Jersey Spinal Cord Injury System). NIDILRR is a Center within the Administration for Community Living (ACL), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The contents of this manuscript do not necessarily represent the policy of the NIDILRR, ACL, or HHS, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine

Keywords

  • Pulmonary ventilation
  • Quadriplegia
  • Rehabilitation
  • Spinal cord injuries

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Observational Study
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

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