Long-Term Effects of Interventions for Weight Loss Using Food Provision and Monetary Incentives

Robert W. Jeffery, Rena R. Wing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

78 Scopus citations

Abstract

One hundred seventy-seven men and women who had participated in an 18-month trial of behavioral interventions involving food provision and financial incentives were examined 12 months later. Food provision, but not financial incentives, led to better weight loss than standard behavioral treatment during the 18-month trial, but over 12 additional months of no-treatment follow-up, all treated groups gained weight, maintained only slightly better weight losses than a no-treatment control group, and did not differ from each other. Weight loss success during both active treatment and maintenance was associated with increase in exercise, decrease in percentage of energy from fat, increase in nutrition knowledge, and decrease in perceived barriers to adherence. Obesity treatment research should focus on developing better ways to maintain changes in the diet and exercise behaviors needed for sustained weight loss.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)793-796
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of consulting and clinical psychology
Volume63
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1995

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