Long-term benefit sustained after bilateral pallidal deep brain stimulation in patients with refractory tardive dystonia

Edward F. Chang, Lauren E. Schrock, Philip A. Starr, Jill L. Ostrem

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

41 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background/Aims: Tardive dystonia (TD) can be a highly disabling, permanent condition related to the use of dopamine-receptor-blocking medications. Our aim was to evaluate the long-term effect of bilateral pallidal deep brain stimulation (DBS) for TD. Methods: Five consecutive patients with disabling TD who underwent stereotactic placement of bilateral globus pallidus internus DBS leads were included. All patients had a history of mood disorder or schizophrenia previously treated with neuroleptic medication, with a mean duration of motor symptoms of 10.2 years. Dystonia severity was measured using the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale (BFMDRS) movement score by a blinded neurologist reviewing pre- and postoperative videotaped examinations. Results: The mean baseline movement BFMDRS score was 49.7 (range 20-88). Overall, we observed a mean reduction of 62% in the BFMDRS movement score within the first year after surgery. Persistent improvement in dystonia (71%) was seen at the last follow-up ranging from 2 to 8 years after surgery. Conclusion: Our experience suggests that pallidal DBS can be an effective therapy with long-term benefits for patients with TD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)304-310
Number of pages7
JournalStereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery
Volume88
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2010

Keywords

  • Deep brain stimulation
  • Long-term outcomes
  • Tardive dyskinesias
  • Tardive dystonia

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Long-term benefit sustained after bilateral pallidal deep brain stimulation in patients with refractory tardive dystonia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this