Long-term association between self-reported signs and symptoms and heart failure hospitalizations: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

Christy L. Avery, Katherine T. Mills, Lloyd E. Chambless, Patricia P. Chang, Aaron R. Folsom, Thomas H. Mosley, Hanyu Ni, Wayne D. Rosamond, Lynne Wagenknecht, Joy Wood, Gerardo Heiss

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13 Scopus citations

Abstract

AimsAlthough studies of the accuracy of heart failure (HF) classification scoring systems are available, few have examined their performance when restricted to self-reported items.Methods and resultsWe evaluated the association between a simplified version of the Gothenburg score, a validated HF score comprised of cardiac and pulmonary signs and symptoms and medication use, and incident HF hospitalizations in 15 430 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study participants. Gothenburg scores (range: 0-3) were constructed using self-reported items obtained at study baseline (1987-89). Incident HF hospitalization over 14.7 years of follow-up was defined as the first identified hospitalization with an ICD-9 discharge code of 428 (n = 1668). Self-reported Gothenburg scores demonstrated very high agreement with the original metric comprised of self-reported and clinical measures and were directly associated with incident HF hospitalizations: [score = 1: hazard rate ratio (HRR) = 1.23 (1.07-1.42); score = 2: HRR = 2.17 (1.92-2.43); score = 3: HRR = 3.98 (3.37-4.70)].ConclusionIn a population-based cohort, self-reported Gothenburg criteria items were associated with hospitalized HF over a prolonged follow-up time. The association was also consistent across groups defined by sex and race, suggesting that this simple score deserves further study as a screening tool for the identification of individuals at high risk of HF in resource-limited settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)232-238
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Heart Failure
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • Gothenburg score
  • Heart failure
  • Surveillance

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    Avery, C. L., Mills, K. T., Chambless, L. E., Chang, P. P., Folsom, A. R., Mosley, T. H., Ni, H., Rosamond, W. D., Wagenknecht, L., Wood, J., & Heiss, G. (2010). Long-term association between self-reported signs and symptoms and heart failure hospitalizations: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. European Journal of Heart Failure, 12(3), 232-238. https://doi.org/10.1093/eurjhf/hfp203