Local dependency, land use attitudes, and economic development: Comparisons between seasonal and permanent residents

Gary P. Green, David Marcouiller, Steven Deller, Daniel Erkkila, N. R. Sumathi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

102 Scopus citations

Abstract

For many rural communities in the United States, tourists and retirees make a major contribution to the local economy. The role of recreational home ownership in these communities is not well understood. We examine the attitudes toward land use controls and local economic development among seasonal and permanent residents. We compare growth machine and local dependency theory explanations for support of land use controls and growth activities. Based on focus groups and survey data collected from seasonal and permanent residents of a northern Wisconsin county, we find that full-time (permanent) residents are much more supportive of local economic development activities and less likely to favor land use planning than are seasonal residents. Socioeconomic differences between seasonal and permanent residents do not explain away the variation between the two groups in these attitudes. Among seasonal residents, support for land use controls declines as they spend more time at their lake homes. The results tend to support Cox and Mair's local dependency thesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)427-445
Number of pages19
JournalRural Sociology
Volume61
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996

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