Listening to Our Collections: Preserving Records of University-Based Educational Radio Stations in Campus Archives

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

University-based educational stations transmitted programing to local audiences throughout the U.S. Surviving records remain in the custody of university archives but remain unavailable due to the complicated nature of radio collections and their audio components, placing them at risk of loss. Using the University of Minnesota station KUOM as a case study, this paper documents archivist successful advocacy for the processing and preservation of historical radio materials. The authors offer reflections on broader strategies that archivists may employ to help process and digitize materials documenting the history of university-based radio within their collections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)38-53
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Archival Organization
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Grant funding for the year-long project was provided by the State of Minnesota from the Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund as administered by the Minnesota Historical Society. Erik Moore served as Principal Investigator and Rebecca Toov was the project archivist.

Funding Information:
Grant funding for the year-long project, “Preservation of Minnesota’s Radio History: An Audio Digital Conversion and Access Project,” was provided by the State of Minnesota from the Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund as administered by the Minnesota Historical Society. Erik Moore served as Principal Investigator and Karen Obermeyer-Kolb and Hannah O’Neill served as project archivists.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020, © 2020 The Author(s). Published with license by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Keywords

  • University radio
  • archival description
  • audio archives

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