Linearity of Ability-Performance Relationships: A Reconfirmation

W. Mark Coward, Paul R Sackett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous research on the nature of ability-performance relationships has found the relationship to be linear. Recent Monte Carlo work suggests that the test of the significance of the difference between the Pearson correlation and the correlation ratio (eta), used in previous research, has low power to detect nonlinear relationships. Using 174 studies of the relationship between 9 scales of the General Aptitude Test Battery and job performance, with a mean sample size of 210, and using a power polynomial approach, which has been shown to have higher power than the r vs. eta test, the issue of linearity was reexamined. Similar to previous findings, nonlinear relationships were not found at levels substantially greater than would be expected by chance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)297-300
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume75
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

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Aptitude
Aptitude Tests
Research
Sample Size
Power (Psychology)

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Linearity of Ability-Performance Relationships : A Reconfirmation. / Coward, W. Mark; Sackett, Paul R.

In: Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol. 75, No. 3, 01.01.1990, p. 297-300.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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