Limiting hazardous noise exposure from noisy toys: Simple, sticky solutions

Heather M. Weinreich, Noel Jabbour, Samuel Levine, Bevan Yueh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothosis To assess noise levels of toys from the Sight & Hearing Association (SHA) 2010 Noisy Toys List and evaluate the change in noise of these toys after covering the speakers with tape or glue. Study Design One Group Pretest-Posttest Design. Methods SHA 2010 Toys List (n = 18) toys were tested at distances of 0 and 25 cm from sound source in a soundproof booth using a digital sound-level meter. The dBA level of sound produced by toy was obtained. Toys with speakers (n = 16) were tested before and after altering speakers with plastic packing tape or nontoxic glue. Results Mean noise level for non-taped toys at 0 and 25 cm was 107.6 dBA (SD ± 8.5) and 82.5 dBA (SD ± 8.8), respectively. With tape, there was a statistically significant decrease in noise level at 0 and 25 cm: 84.2 dBA and 68.2 dBA (P <0.001). With glue, there was a statistically significant decrease in noise level at 0 cm and 25 cm: 79.7 dBA and 66.4 dBA (P <0.001). Conclusions Both tape and glue significantly decreased the noise level produced by the toys. However, there was no significant difference between tape or glue. Overall, altering the toy can significantly decrease the sound a child may experience when playing with toys. However, some toys, even after altering, still produce sound levels that may be considered dangerous.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2240-2244
Number of pages5
JournalLaryngoscope
Volume123
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013

Keywords

  • Noise exposure
  • hearing loss
  • noise

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