Limitations on using CDOM as a proxy for DOC in temperate lakes

Claire G. Griffin, Jacques C Finlay, Patrick L. Brezonik, Leif Olmanson, Raymond M Hozalski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) has been widely studied as part of efforts to improve understanding of the aquatic carbon cycle, by laboratory, in situ, and remote sensing methods. We studied ecoregion-scale differences in CDOM and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to understand variability in organic matter composition and the use of CDOM as a proxy for DOC. Data from 299 lakes across the U.S. Upper Midwest showed that CDOM, measured as absorptivity at 440 nm (a440), correlated strongly with DOC (R2 = 0.81, n = 412). Colored lakes in the Northern Lakes and Forests (NLF) ecoregion drove this relationship. Lakes in the North Central Hardwood Forests (NCHF) had low color (most had a440 < 3 m−1) and weaker CDOM-DOC relationships (R2 = 0.47). Spectral slopes and specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA), indicated relatively low aromaticity and non-terrestrial DOM sources in low color lakes. Multiple regression analyses that included total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) and CDOM, but not chlorophyll a, improved DOC estimates in low color lakes, suggesting a dominant contribution of non-planktonic sources of low color DOM in these lakes. Our results show that CDOM is a reliable, regional proxy for DOC in lakes where forests and wetlands dominate the landscape and the DOM is primarily terrestrial in origin. Mapping of lake DOC at broad spatial scales by satellite-derived CDOM has lower accuracy in low color lakes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)719-727
Number of pages9
JournalWater Research
Volume144
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

Fingerprint

Organic carbon
dissolved organic matter
Biological materials
dissolved organic carbon
Lakes
lake
Color
ecoregion
Hardwoods
Chlorophyll
Wetlands
absorbance
carbon cycle
multiple regression
Remote sensing
chlorophyll a
wetland
Satellites
Nitrogen
remote sensing

Keywords

  • Aquatic carbon cycle
  • Colored dissolved organic matter
  • Dissolved organic carbon
  • Lakes

Cite this

Limitations on using CDOM as a proxy for DOC in temperate lakes. / Griffin, Claire G.; Finlay, Jacques C; Brezonik, Patrick L.; Olmanson, Leif; Hozalski, Raymond M.

In: Water Research, Vol. 144, 01.11.2018, p. 719-727.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d24a965910ac4bde9f84ce85035603f8,
title = "Limitations on using CDOM as a proxy for DOC in temperate lakes",
abstract = "Colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) has been widely studied as part of efforts to improve understanding of the aquatic carbon cycle, by laboratory, in situ, and remote sensing methods. We studied ecoregion-scale differences in CDOM and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to understand variability in organic matter composition and the use of CDOM as a proxy for DOC. Data from 299 lakes across the U.S. Upper Midwest showed that CDOM, measured as absorptivity at 440 nm (a440), correlated strongly with DOC (R2 = 0.81, n = 412). Colored lakes in the Northern Lakes and Forests (NLF) ecoregion drove this relationship. Lakes in the North Central Hardwood Forests (NCHF) had low color (most had a440 < 3 m−1) and weaker CDOM-DOC relationships (R2 = 0.47). Spectral slopes and specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA), indicated relatively low aromaticity and non-terrestrial DOM sources in low color lakes. Multiple regression analyses that included total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) and CDOM, but not chlorophyll a, improved DOC estimates in low color lakes, suggesting a dominant contribution of non-planktonic sources of low color DOM in these lakes. Our results show that CDOM is a reliable, regional proxy for DOC in lakes where forests and wetlands dominate the landscape and the DOM is primarily terrestrial in origin. Mapping of lake DOC at broad spatial scales by satellite-derived CDOM has lower accuracy in low color lakes.",
keywords = "Aquatic carbon cycle, Colored dissolved organic matter, Dissolved organic carbon, Lakes",
author = "Griffin, {Claire G.} and Finlay, {Jacques C} and Brezonik, {Patrick L.} and Leif Olmanson and Hozalski, {Raymond M}",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.watres.2018.08.007",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "144",
pages = "719--727",
journal = "Water Research",
issn = "0043-1354",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Limitations on using CDOM as a proxy for DOC in temperate lakes

AU - Griffin, Claire G.

AU - Finlay, Jacques C

AU - Brezonik, Patrick L.

AU - Olmanson, Leif

AU - Hozalski, Raymond M

PY - 2018/11/1

Y1 - 2018/11/1

N2 - Colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) has been widely studied as part of efforts to improve understanding of the aquatic carbon cycle, by laboratory, in situ, and remote sensing methods. We studied ecoregion-scale differences in CDOM and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to understand variability in organic matter composition and the use of CDOM as a proxy for DOC. Data from 299 lakes across the U.S. Upper Midwest showed that CDOM, measured as absorptivity at 440 nm (a440), correlated strongly with DOC (R2 = 0.81, n = 412). Colored lakes in the Northern Lakes and Forests (NLF) ecoregion drove this relationship. Lakes in the North Central Hardwood Forests (NCHF) had low color (most had a440 < 3 m−1) and weaker CDOM-DOC relationships (R2 = 0.47). Spectral slopes and specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA), indicated relatively low aromaticity and non-terrestrial DOM sources in low color lakes. Multiple regression analyses that included total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) and CDOM, but not chlorophyll a, improved DOC estimates in low color lakes, suggesting a dominant contribution of non-planktonic sources of low color DOM in these lakes. Our results show that CDOM is a reliable, regional proxy for DOC in lakes where forests and wetlands dominate the landscape and the DOM is primarily terrestrial in origin. Mapping of lake DOC at broad spatial scales by satellite-derived CDOM has lower accuracy in low color lakes.

AB - Colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) has been widely studied as part of efforts to improve understanding of the aquatic carbon cycle, by laboratory, in situ, and remote sensing methods. We studied ecoregion-scale differences in CDOM and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to understand variability in organic matter composition and the use of CDOM as a proxy for DOC. Data from 299 lakes across the U.S. Upper Midwest showed that CDOM, measured as absorptivity at 440 nm (a440), correlated strongly with DOC (R2 = 0.81, n = 412). Colored lakes in the Northern Lakes and Forests (NLF) ecoregion drove this relationship. Lakes in the North Central Hardwood Forests (NCHF) had low color (most had a440 < 3 m−1) and weaker CDOM-DOC relationships (R2 = 0.47). Spectral slopes and specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA), indicated relatively low aromaticity and non-terrestrial DOM sources in low color lakes. Multiple regression analyses that included total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) and CDOM, but not chlorophyll a, improved DOC estimates in low color lakes, suggesting a dominant contribution of non-planktonic sources of low color DOM in these lakes. Our results show that CDOM is a reliable, regional proxy for DOC in lakes where forests and wetlands dominate the landscape and the DOM is primarily terrestrial in origin. Mapping of lake DOC at broad spatial scales by satellite-derived CDOM has lower accuracy in low color lakes.

KW - Aquatic carbon cycle

KW - Colored dissolved organic matter

KW - Dissolved organic carbon

KW - Lakes

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85051122638&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85051122638&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.watres.2018.08.007

DO - 10.1016/j.watres.2018.08.007

M3 - Article

VL - 144

SP - 719

EP - 727

JO - Water Research

JF - Water Research

SN - 0043-1354

ER -