Limitations in the Assessment of DSM-IV Cannabis Tolerance as an Indicator of Dependence in Adolescents

Tammy Chung, Christopher S. Martin, Jack R. Cornelius, Ken C. Winters, James W. Langenbucher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

The usefulness of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual's (4th ed.; DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) tolerance criterion as an indicator of dependence has been debated. The authors of this study evaluated the performance of DSM's cannabis tolerance criterion, operationally defined as a percentage increase in quantity needed to get high, in distinguishing adolescents with and without cannabis dependence. Two samples of adolescent cannabis users (ages 12-19) provided data (ns = 417 and 380). Tolerance, defined as a percentage increase (median increase = 300% and 175%, respectively, in the samples), had only moderate overall sensitivity and specificity in distinguishing those with and without cannabis dependence. Results suggest limitations of the DSM-IV's change-based operational definition of tolerance in adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)136-146
Number of pages11
JournalExperimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2004

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