Life Satisfaction in Adult Survivors of Childhood Brain Tumors

Deborah B. Crom, Zhenghong Li, Tara M. Brinkman, Melissa M. Hudson, Gregory T. Armstrong, Joseph P Neglia, Kirsten K. Ness

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Adult survivors of childhood brain tumors experience multiple, significant, lifelong deficits as a consequence of their malignancy and therapy. Current survivorship literature documents the substantial impact such impairments have on survivors’ physical health and quality of life. Psychosocial reports detail educational, cognitive, and emotional limitations characterizing survivors as especially fragile, often incompetent, and unreliable in evaluating their circumstances. Anecdotal data suggest some survivors report life experiences similar to those of healthy controls. The aim of our investigation was to determine whether life satisfaction in adult survivors of childhood brain tumors differs from that of healthy controls and to identify potential predictors of life satisfaction in survivors. This cross-sectional study compared 78 brain tumor survivors with population-based matched controls. Chi-square tests, t tests, and linear regression models were used to investigate patterns of life satisfaction and identify potential correlates. Results indicated that life satisfaction of adult survivors of childhood brain tumors was similar to that of healthy controls. Survivors’ general health expectations emerged as the primary correlate of life satisfaction. Understanding life satisfaction as an important variable will optimize the design of strategies to enhance participation in follow-up care, reduce suffering, and optimize quality of life in this vulnerable population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)317-326
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 12 2014

Fingerprint

Brain Neoplasms
Survivors
Linear Models
Quality of Life
Aftercare
Life Change Events
Health
Vulnerable Populations
Chi-Square Distribution
Psychological Stress
Survival Rate
Cross-Sectional Studies
Population

Keywords

  • life satisfaction
  • pediatric brain tumors
  • quality of life
  • survivorship

Cite this

Crom, D. B., Li, Z., Brinkman, T. M., Hudson, M. M., Armstrong, G. T., Neglia, J. P., & Ness, K. K. (2014). Life Satisfaction in Adult Survivors of Childhood Brain Tumors. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, 31(6), 317-326. https://doi.org/10.1177/1043454214534532

Life Satisfaction in Adult Survivors of Childhood Brain Tumors. / Crom, Deborah B.; Li, Zhenghong; Brinkman, Tara M.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Neglia, Joseph P; Ness, Kirsten K.

In: Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, Vol. 31, No. 6, 12.11.2014, p. 317-326.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Crom, DB, Li, Z, Brinkman, TM, Hudson, MM, Armstrong, GT, Neglia, JP & Ness, KK 2014, 'Life Satisfaction in Adult Survivors of Childhood Brain Tumors', Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, vol. 31, no. 6, pp. 317-326. https://doi.org/10.1177/1043454214534532
Crom, Deborah B. ; Li, Zhenghong ; Brinkman, Tara M. ; Hudson, Melissa M. ; Armstrong, Gregory T. ; Neglia, Joseph P ; Ness, Kirsten K. / Life Satisfaction in Adult Survivors of Childhood Brain Tumors. In: Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing. 2014 ; Vol. 31, No. 6. pp. 317-326.
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