Leisure-time physical activity sustained since midlife and preservation of cognitive function: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

Priya Palta, A. Richey Sharrett, Jennifer A. Deal, Kelly R. Evenson, Kelley Pettee Gabriel, Aaron R. Folsom, Alden L. Gross, B. Gwen Windham, David Knopman, Thomas H. Mosley, Gerardo Heiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: We tested the hypotheses that higher levels of and persistence of midlife leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) are associated long-term with lower cognitive decline and less incident dementia. Methods: A total of 10,705 participants (mean age: 60 years) had LTPA (no, low, middle, or high) measured in 1987-1989 and 1993-1995. LTPA was assessed in relation to incident dementia and 14-year change in general cognitive performance. Results: Over a median follow-up of 17.4 years, 1063 dementia cases were observed. Compared with no LTPA, high LTPA in midlife was associated with lower incidence of dementia (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 0.71 [0.61, 0.86]) and lower declines in general cognitive performance (−0.07 standard deviation difference [−0.12 to −0.04]). These associations were stronger when measured against persistence of midlife LTPA over 6 years. Discussion: LTPA is a readily modifiable factor associated inversely with long-term dementia incidence and cognitive decline.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)273-281
Number of pages9
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors thank the staff and participants of the ARIC study for their important contributions. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study is carried out as a collaborative study supported by National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute contracts ( HHSN268201100005C , HHSN268201100006C , HHSN268201100007C , HHSN268201100008C , HHSN268201100009C , HHSN268201100010C , HHSN268201100011C , and HHSN268201100012C ). Neurocognitive data were collected by U01 HL096812, HL096814, HL096899, HL096902, and HL096917 with previous brain MRI examinations funded by R01-HL70825. The views expressed in this manuscript are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; the National Institute of Aging; the National Institutes of Health; or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Funding Information:
Conflicts of interest: P.P. was supported by grant K99-AG052830 from the National Institute of Aging. J.A.D. is supported by grant K01-AG054693 from the National Institute of Aging. A.L.G. was supported by K01-AG050699 from the National Institute on Aging.The authors thank the staff and participants of the ARIC study for their important contributions. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study is carried out as a collaborative study supported by National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute contracts (HHSN268201100005C, HHSN268201100006C, HHSN268201100007C, HHSN268201100008C, HHSN268201100009C, HHSN268201100010C, HHSN268201100011C, and HHSN268201100012C). Neurocognitive data were collected by U01 HL096812, HL096814, HL096899, HL096902, and HL096917 with previous brain MRI examinations funded by R01-HL70825. The views expressed in this manuscript are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; the National Institute of Aging; the National Institutes of Health; or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Funding Information:
Conflicts of interest: P.P. was supported by grant K99-AG052830 from the National Institute of Aging . J.A.D. is supported by grant K01-AG054693 from the National Institute of Aging . A.L.G. was supported by K01-AG050699 from the National Institute on Aging .

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 the Alzheimer's Association

Copyright:
Copyright 2019 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Cognitive decline
  • Cohort study
  • Dementia
  • Epidemiology
  • Physical activity

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