Learning within a learner control training environment: The interactive effects of goal orientation and metacognitive instruction on learning outcomes

Aaron M. Schmidt, J. Kevin Ford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

195 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study proposes that effective engagement in metacognitive activities is critical to success in high learner-control training environments. A model was developed that focuses on the interactive effects of goal orientation and a metacognitive training intervention on metacognitive activity and learning outcomes. Seventy-nine participants completed a Web-based training course on how to create Web pages. Consistent with expectations, learners reporting greater levels of metacognitive activity during training gained more declarative knowledge, performed better on a skill-based measure, and had higher levels of self-efficacy. Metacognitive activity was also found to partially mediate the relationship between goal orientation and learning outcomes. Finally, the expected goal orientation by intervention interaction was found. The metacognitive intervention was beneficial in enhancing metacognitive activity for trainees with low performance-avoidance orientations, but resulted in lower metacognitive activity among highly avoidant learners. Implications of these findings for research on self-regulation and training practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)405-429
Number of pages25
JournalPersonnel Psychology
Volume56
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

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