Learning style and factors contributing to success in an introductory computer science course

James Allert

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

An introductory course in computer science (CSJ) is required of virtually all engineering majors at the University of Minnesota Duluth. From 2001-present an extensive battery of visualization software was developed for this course. Students consistently ranked the visualization software as more important to their learning than any other element of the course. However, these rankings were not highly correlated with actual outcomes. This study of learning style determined that reflective and verbal learners outperformed active and visual ones. Student opinions of the value of programming projects and lectures rank highest and seem to cut across learning style preference. Background familiarity with computers and software was not a strong correlate, although involvement in computer and video gaming was found to be negatively correlated with course success.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies, ICALT 2004
Editors Kinshuk, C.-K. Looi, E. Sutinen, D. Sampson, I. Aedo, L. Uden, E. Kaehkoenen
Pages385-389
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004
EventProceedings - IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies, ICALT 2004 - Joensuu, Finland
Duration: Aug 30 2004Sep 1 2004

Publication series

NameProceedings - IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies, ICALT 2004

Other

OtherProceedings - IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies, ICALT 2004
CountryFinland
CityJoensuu
Period8/30/049/1/04

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