Lateral ventricular cerebrospinal fluid diffusivity as a potential neuroimaging marker of brain temperature in multiple sclerosis: A hypothesis and implications

Khader M. Hasan, John A. Lincoln, Flavia M. Nelson, Jerry S. Wolinsky, Ponnada A. Narayana

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this retrospective study we tested the hypothesis that the net effect of impaired electrical conduction and therefore increased heat dissipation in multiple sclerosis (MS) results in elevated lateral ventricular (LV) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diffusivity as a measure of brain temperature estimated in vivo using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). We used validated DTI-based segmentation methods to obtain normalized LV-CSF volume and its corresponding CSF diffusivity in 108 MS patients and 103 healthy controls in the age range of 21-63 years. The LV CSF diffusivity was ~2% higher in MS compared to controls that correspond to a temperature rise of ~1°C that could not be explained by changes in the CSF viscosity due to altered CSF protein content in MS. The LV diffusivity decreased with age in healthy controls (r=-0.29; p=0.003), but not in MS (r=0.15; p=0.11), possibly related to MS pathology. Age-adjusted LV diffusivity increased with lesion load (r=0.518; p=1×10-8). Our data suggest that the total brain lesion load is the primary contributor to the increase in LV CSF diffusivity in MS. These findings suggest that LV diffusivity is a potential in vivo biomarker of the mismatch between heat generation and dissipation in MS. We also discuss limitations and possible confounders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)262-269
Number of pages8
JournalMagnetic Resonance Imaging
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

Keywords

  • Age
  • Cerebrospinal fluid
  • Diffusion tensor imaging
  • Lateral ventricles
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Temperature

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