Laser Iithotripsy for removal of uroliths in dogs

Larry G. Adams, Jody P Lulich

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: This study evaluated the ability to fragment and remove naturally occurring uroliths in dogs using a holmium: YAG laser. Methods: Twenty four dogs with naturally occurring uroliths including 10 spayed females and 14 neutered males. The dogs were 8.7 ± 2.8 years old and weighed 13.7 ± 8.0 kg. All dogs had bladder stones and 5 male dogs also had urethral stones. In female dogs, cystoscopy was performed using a rigid cystoscope with sheath diameter of 14 to 19 french. Cystoscopy was performed in males dogs using a 7.5 french diameter pediatric ureteroscope. Uroliths were fragmented using a 20 watt Holmium: YAG laser and the fragments were removed by basket extraction and voiding urohydropropulsion. Results: Average laser parameters for urolith fragmentation were 0.7 Joules at 8 Hertz (range: 0.5 to 1.3 Joules at 5 to 13 Hertz). All urolith fragments were successfully removed in all 10 female dogs and 11 of 14 male dogs. In one male dog, the urethra was too small to allow passage of the ureteroscope. In one of the male dogs, the urethral stones were successfully removed by laser lithotripsy, but removal of the bladder stones was performed by cystotomy. There was one complication of urethral perforation during attempts to pass an access sheath transurethrally in a dog with extensive proliferative urethritis. Conclusions: Laser lithotripsy is a safe and effective method of removing bladder and urethral stones in dogs provided the dog is large enough to permit transurethral passage of a cystoscope or ureteroscope.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
DOIs
StatePublished - May 8 2006
EventPhotonic Therapeutics and Diagnostics II - San Jose, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 21 2006Jan 24 2006

Publication series

NameProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
Volume6078
ISSN (Print)1605-7422

Conference

ConferencePhotonic Therapeutics and Diagnostics II
CountryUnited States
CitySan Jose, CA
Period1/21/061/24/06

Fingerprint

dogs
Lasers
Dogs
Holmium
lasers
Ureteroscopes
Urinary Bladder Calculi
rocks
bladder
Pediatrics
Cystoscopes
Laser Lithotripsy
Cystoscopy
holmium
Solid-State Lasers
fragments
sheaths
YAG lasers
Cystotomy
baskets

Keywords

  • Canine
  • Holmium: YAG
  • Lithotripsy
  • Uroliths

Cite this

Adams, L. G., & Lulich, J. P. (2006). Laser Iithotripsy for removal of uroliths in dogs. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE [607836] (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE; Vol. 6078). https://doi.org/10.1117/12.646820

Laser Iithotripsy for removal of uroliths in dogs. / Adams, Larry G.; Lulich, Jody P.

Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. 2006. 607836 (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE; Vol. 6078).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Adams, LG & Lulich, JP 2006, Laser Iithotripsy for removal of uroliths in dogs. in Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE., 607836, Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE, vol. 6078, Photonic Therapeutics and Diagnostics II, San Jose, CA, United States, 1/21/06. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.646820
Adams LG, Lulich JP. Laser Iithotripsy for removal of uroliths in dogs. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. 2006. 607836. (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE). https://doi.org/10.1117/12.646820
Adams, Larry G. ; Lulich, Jody P. / Laser Iithotripsy for removal of uroliths in dogs. Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. 2006. (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE).
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