Large-scale simulation of nanoparticle synthesis in turbulent reacting flows, the effects of turbulence and mixing on formation and growth

Sean C. Garrick, Guanghai Wang, Nelson Settumba

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Vapor-phase synthesis of nano-structured materials is a cost-effective and controllable means for the production of wide variety of materials, including those used in fuel cells, energetic materials, and chemical sensors, amongst others. In nearly all high-rate synthesis methods for nanoparticles, chemical precursors are brought together by turbulent mixing to form particle nuclei that grow rapidly due to surface addition and aggregation. Next-generation applications of nanoparticles will require precise control of product quality when synthesis methods are scaled up. Predicting nanoparticle aggregation starting with detailed knowledge chemical and thermodynamic histories, as well as the time-dependent flow properties are key to the reliable scale-up of high-rate synthesis methods. This work describes a computational approach which provides knowledge of particle field in a model free manner, as a function of space, time, and size. We show the effects of mixing on nanoparticle area during flame synthesis, the segregation of nanoparticles in turbulent jets, and the effects of turbulence on the growth of nanoparticles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication05AIChE
Subtitle of host publication2005 AIChE Annual Meeting and Fall Showcase, Conference Proceedings
Number of pages1
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005
Event05AIChE: 2005 AIChE Annual Meeting and Fall Showcase - Cincinnati, OH, United States
Duration: Oct 30 2005Nov 4 2005

Other

Other05AIChE: 2005 AIChE Annual Meeting and Fall Showcase
CountryUnited States
CityCincinnati, OH
Period10/30/0511/4/05

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