Lack of effect of specific sodium hunger on learned aversions to sodium and sucrose

Ava M. Trent, James W. Kalat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Frumkin (1975) reported that sodium-deficient rats fail to learn taste aversions to NaCl. However, those rats were sodium-deficient at the time of testing as well as at the time of training; any learned aversion could have been masked by a strong sodium hunger. Rats were made temporarily sodium-hungry by injections of Formalin or aldosterone. They were then poisoned after drinking both an NaCl and a sucrose solution. Several days later they were tested for learned aversions. Rats trained under the influence of aldosterone did not differ from controls. Rats trained under the influence of Formalin acquired slightly weaker aversions to both NaCl and sucrose. Thus there is no evidence that sodium deficiency alters the associability of NaCl with poison.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)243-246
Number of pages4
JournalAnimal Learning & Behavior
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 1977

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