Kinetics of transition of anhydrous carbamazepine to carbamazepine dihydrate in aqueous suspensions

Winnie Wai Ling Young, Raj Suryanarayanan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When suspended in water, anhydrous carbamazepine (C15H12N2O; 1) was transformed to carbamazepine dihydrate (C15H12N2O · 2H2O; 2). Compound 1 was dispersed in water at 25 °C, and an aliquot of the slurry was taken at periodic intervals and immediately filtered under conditions which removed all the physically bound water from the solid. The weight fractions of 1 and 2 in the solid were quantified by two methods: (a) by determining the weight loss on drying the solid at 60 °C under reduced pressure to a constant weight and (b) by a quantitative powder X‐ray diffraction technique. There was good agreement between the above two methods. More than 95% (w/w) of 1 was converted to 2 in 1 h and the decrease in the weight fraction of 1 with time was approximately a first‐order process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)496-500
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Volume80
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991

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Carbamazepine
Suspensions
Weights and Measures
Water
Powder Diffraction
X-Ray Diffraction
Weight Loss
Pressure

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Kinetics of transition of anhydrous carbamazepine to carbamazepine dihydrate in aqueous suspensions. / Young, Winnie Wai Ling; Suryanarayanan, Raj.

In: Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vol. 80, No. 5, 01.01.1991, p. 496-500.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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