Kinetic occlusion: Further studies of the boundary-flow cue

Lincoln G. Craton, Albert Yonas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Previous work has demonstrated that human beings employ a processing assumption, the boundary-flow constraint, in perceiving the order of depth at an edge. Subjects perceive depth order of surfaces on the basis of the relative motions of an image boundary and a projected surface texture on either side of the boundary. In the present study, adult subjects viewed computer generated kinematograms in which boundary-flow information provided the only cue for depth order. The results of Experiments 1 and 2 indicate that common motion between boundary and texture and differential motion between boundary and texture can independently generate the perception of ordered depths of surfaces. In Experiment 3, we examined the interaction of two processes involved in the extraction of depth order from boundary-flow displays: (1) the propagation of foreground and background surfaces from texture to boundary; and (2) the computation of depth order of surfaces on either side of the boundary. The results indicate that while the mechanism that computes depth from boundary-flow information functions reliably when the mean distance between texture and boundary is 8.1 o,surface propagation may be disrupted for distances of this magnitude.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)169-179
Number of pages11
JournalPerception & Psychophysics
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1990

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