Kidney donor outcomes ≥ 50 years after donation

Daniel O. Keys, Scott Jackson, Danielle Berglund, Arthur J. Matas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Many living kidney donors (LDs) are young at donation; yet there are little data on long-term LD follow-up. We report on 66 LDs who donated ≥50 years ago: 22 (33.3%) are still alive (current age, 78.5 ± 7.25 years); 39 (59%) died (mean age at death, 74.2 ± 12.3 years); and 5 are lost to follow-up (mean age at last contact, 68.7 ± 4.6 years). Those who died were older at donation (P <.001). Causes of death included 12 (30.8% of deaths) cardiovascular diseases, 9 (23.0%) respiratory failures, 5 (12.8%) malignancies and 4 (10.3%) infections, and 9 (23%) were unknown or miscellaneous. Forty-nine living donors (74%) developed hypertension at a mean age of 59.9 ± 14.0 years; 12 (18%) developed diabetes at a mean age of 62 ± 19.4 years; and 11 (16.7%) developed proteinuria at a mean age of 60.6 ± 18.2 years—each at a similar incidence as seen in the age-matched general population. At last follow-up, the eGFR by CKD-EPI (mean ± SD) for donors currently alive was 60.2 ± 13.4 mL/min/1.73 m2; for those that died, 54.0 ± 21.5 mL/min/1.73 m2; for those lost to follow-up, 55.6 ± 7.5 mL/min/1.73 m2. ESRD developed in 2 (3.3%). SF-36 quality of life health survey scores (n = 21) were similar to the age-matched general population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere13657
JournalClinical Transplantation
Volume33
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We thank Stephanie Taylor for help in preparation of the manuscript.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Copyright:
Copyright 2019 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • donor nephrectomy
  • donor outcomes
  • donors and donation
  • donors and donation: donor follow-up
  • donors and donation: living, patient survival

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